Taylor Schilling talks about what winning a SAG Award means to her

Taylor Schilling talks about what winning a SAG Award means to her

From Variety

The words that you should “remember where you came from” could easily be the motto of the Screen Actors Guild Awards. While many of the winners are household names and living legacies, they all know too well what it feels like to audition to be Waiter Number Four (again).

That the SAG Awards have only grown in media scrutiny and prominence since their debut in 1995 has not gone unnoticed by the winners. Nor do they necessarily think this is a bad thing.

Taylor Schilling
Netflix’s “Orange Is the New Black” has won the TV comedy ensemble category every year since it became eligible in 2014. But star Schilling’s speech at the 2017 ceremony got a particularly strong reaction when she called out the then-newly elected commander in chief of the United States.
Her remarks were a response to President Trump’s executive order earlier in the week banning immigrants from certain countries from entering the U.S. (a ban that has since been struck down in courts). Schilling is part of the most ethnically and racially diverse casts on TV — and she says she needed to comment that night.

“This story that we’re telling through this show, collectively, would not be possible without refugees and immigrants,” she says now. “You can’t unbraid the show from the immigrant experience and it felt vital that, if we were going to be honored again, then we needed to acknowledge it.”

She says this win also resonated with her because she feels “the SAG Awards are the most meaningful of all the awards.” She thinks about the Theodore Roosevelt speech that claims that the person who truly counts isn’t the critic, but the “man who is actually in the arena.”

“We’re really all in the ring together,” she says. “To be acknowledged by somebody who truly understands the experience? I don’t know what could be more exciting than that.”

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New interview and video of Taylor Schilling from Vogue

New interview and video of Taylor Schilling from Vogue

From Vogue

Lately, Taylor Schilling has been starting her days writing. About a year ago, the 33-year-old actress and star of Orange Is the New Black realized that setting aside time in the morning just to write—no goal, no agenda, no word count—tuned her in for the rest of the day. “I’m finding that if I wake up and write out whatever is clogging up my thinking—fears, worries, whatever it is—that by the time I’m done writing, I’m a little more focused on what I want to have happen, instead of what I’m afraid of.”

Schilling feels her best in the morning—“I love the freshness of a new day”—and she relishes those moments to herself when time stands still: eating breakfast, writing, and drinking tea in her Brooklyn home. “It sets me up and focuses me on what I’m curious about,” she says. “Kind of tosses the external stuff that’s not as important and connects me to my values, and what matters.”

What matters to the Emmy-nominated actor these days—while she films the sixth season of Orange Is the New Black—is using her talents to make an impact. It can be anything from voicing concerns on behalf of her peers to calling lawmakers about issues she’s passionate about, or even babysitting a friend’s child. “That’s really a go-to way for me to feel beautiful, when I’m making some kind of contribution,” she says, reflectively. “It’s part and parcel of feeling beautiful. Yes, I feel incredibly beautiful when my skin is gorgeous, and after I’ve exercised and I’ve been eating in a clean way; or when I’m ready to go out for an evening—I love that stuff. But that can be more hit-or-miss in terms of an internal feeling of real power or beauty. It’s the physical part lined up with my own power.”

When Schilling was little, around the same time she saw community theater productions which inspired her to pursue acting, she felt beauty in physical triumphs such as when she could win a race against her brother or do a swing flip on the monkey bars. “I felt impenetrable,” she says. “I think that’s my earliest recollection of beauty. That feeling of attractiveness, and feeling magnetic and confident. And then it shifted a little bit,” she admits. “But I try to remember that and use it as a touchstone for what beauty means to me. I was embodied, inside of myself. I felt confident and ready to go.” This is where Genaissance de La Mer— a time-reversing formulation born from the crystals in a castoff beaker in the La Mer lab—and Schilling’s perspective meet: an understanding that there’s beauty and strength to be found in the unassuming, seemingly unremarkable moments every day.

Schilling refers back to that feeling of being grounded in her body as she continues to garner acclaim in a field where painting on a persona is part of the gig. “I can put on as many layers of shellac as I want, but my belief is that you can’t really fool anybody,” she says. “And what I love about Orange is that it celebrates all of that inside stuff. It’s made me bolder in my own life. It’s taught me that it’s not about seeking approval.” It’s also made her more forthcoming with the people who inspire her. “I’ve started doing this thing where I write to people whose work I love—writers, artists—sometimes just to offer gratitude or appreciation. It’s helpful,” she says, “And it’s kind of fun to write fan mail.”

New interview of Taylor Schilling with InstaMag

Here’s a new interview of Taylor Schilling with InstaMag

From InstaMag

Schilling essays role of Piper Chapman in “Orange is the New Black”, which is aired in India on Colors Infinity.
She said in a statement: “There’s so much humour and I think the humour is absolutely universal, but that idea of being in the context of you know people at their lowest, there’s so much freedom to that and I think we need to be reminded that even when we’re there, we’re okay and we’re valuable, and our humanity is intact and our voice is of value in the world.
“And I think the show does that, it pays a lot of respect to people at every point in their lives. So, it’s something deeply universal to me.”
Based on the best-selling memoir “Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison” by Piper Kerman and created by Jenji Kohan, the Emmy-award winning TV series is set in a fictional prison in Litchfield, New York.
Schilling also feels that there is an international appeal to the show as “it deals with basic universal human themes of wanting to connect, wanting to be seen for who you are, of what happens, how are we judged, are we judged by doing things we’re of, not proud are we judged by the worst, darkest moments in our lives or by the lighter moments in our lives and can those things coexist.”
“I think that there’s a real raw honesty to meeting people in a space where the”re at the lowest moment in their lives,” she added.

Taylor Schilling Interview with Diaro Sur

Taylor Schilling’s interview with Diaro Sur 

From Diaro Sur (Google translation)

Actress Taylor Schilling (Boston, 32) made her debut with the film “Dark Matter” (2007), opposite Meryl Streep. Six years later she received the role of her life, ‘Orange is the New Black’ – Piper Chapman. The series is inspired by a book of the same name written by Piper Kerman, where the protagonist talks about her experience in prison while portraying the women she met. The adaptation was by Jenji Kohan, declared by Time magazine as one of the hundred most influential people in the world. ‘Orange is the New Black’ does not just show life behind the bars. His narration investigates the life of each prey, the human aspect and the loneliness that these women suffer in silence. Netflix, the platform with fifty million subscribers worldwide, produces this series that in Spain issues (the fifth season) Movistar. In Los Angeles we were able to interview Taylor Schilling, who in fiction has stopped being an innocent woman to become a survivor behind the bars.

Read the interview after the jump

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